Shady Oaks Miniature Horses

Raising Miniature Horses 30 inches and Under

Mini Foals For Sale

Take a look at our 2017 foal crop we have for sale.  Still have a few left.  Give us a call to see what is available and if you have any questions.

Congratulations to our New Owners!

This year has been a remarkable year with our babies going all over the country to their new homes.

We have some very excited customers who received some of our best horses and foals.  I’m happy that they went to such loving families.

Thank you for all who has requested information on our horses.  We have one little stallion left from last years 2015 crop that is still quite small and

very colorful.  We have plenty of quality breeding stallions for sale and several mares that hopefully will be foaling soon.

If you want to purchase a great foundation mare or stallion, please look at our horses.  They would make great a great start or addition to your farm.minis2015

Miniature Horses for Sale

We have a large selection of minis of all colors and mostly small.  If you are looking for a good bred mini or breeding stallion, we have something to suit every price range.

Give us a call or email and see what we have available for you.

Just posted our 2015 Foals for Sale

This year, one of our tiniest colts was born.  He will stay SMALL.  Will get everyone measured soon, but he is going to mature probably under 27″.  Our stallions are colorful and a tiny little sorrel filly.  She is the granddaughter of our tiny 26″ stallion, Yancy.

Isn't he adorable.  So tiny! So perfect.

Isn’t he adorable. So tiny! So perfect.

Need you website updated?

If you need your old website updated, please contact me to talk about what you’d like to have.  Many of you have very old websites that need to be cleaned up and modernized. Call or email and I’ll be glad to go over some ideas to help your website stay fresh and current.

 

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New Foal!

We had a tiny colt born on Saturday.  This was the first foal born to our Mare,  Shady Oaks Pumpkin.  She didn’t have any milk at first, but if finally came in after giving her some shots to bring the milk in. The little guy is solid white with one dark black spot on the top of his head.  He is very tiny and very strong.  Just as cute as ever.  See his picture.

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Thanks for an informative site.

I just wanted to say “thank you” for having such a nice, informative web site. I am getting a Mini colt(11 months), and it has been 20 years since I have had mini’s. I grew up with 2 as a child, and have a full size horse now, but wanted a “refresher” course. I have searched long and hard on the net, and there has been a lot of vague info, but your site was very helpful.

Thanks again! Sincerely,

Alicia A. Bentley

Llaughing Llama Farm

Miniature Foaling

If you have a bred mare, and know the date she was bred, expect the foaling time to be approximately 11 months and 11 days.  But with minis, they will fool you.  Have a clean stall available if it is near time or let them stay out in the pasture where it is a more clean environment.  If you see your mare start to foal and pushing with nothing coming out, call a vet right away.  If this is your first foaling experience, call a vet.  They will have a foal when you least expect it and believe me staying awake night after night, they will lay down and have it while you are eating lunch. Make sure your mare is bred to a small stallion, from small parents, especially if your mare is very tiny.  Foals with too big of heads can not come out.  This can be a very heartbreaking experience for anyone.  It is very hard for a mare to have a foal, so be patient.  Selective breeding is important.  Getting a live foal every year from a mare is not always guaranteed.  (minis are harder to foal than a regular size horse)

Taking Care of Your Miniature Horse

Your horse needs to be not only fed properly, and have enough exercise by being turned out daily, but also, wormed regularly. You can do this yourself. Every 2 to 3 months, paste worm them in the mouth. Try to rotate your wormers each time. I use about 250lb mark for mine. (small foals are less of course) Put the paste wormer tube way in the back of the mouth. Do this on an empty stomach, not at feeding time. Wormer can be purchased at feed stores, vet offices, or ordered from Vet supply catalogs. They cost from $4 to $12 a tube.  Also, your mini should have his hoofs trimmed about every 3 to 4 months, depending how fast they grow.  As for vaccinations, if your horses are exposed to any other horses, I recommend vaccinating for several viruses, and other equine infections, along with a rabies shot. All minis should be given a tetanus shot, in case they get injured. Veterinarians can administer these, or you can get most of them through vet supply houses.  If you don’t think you can do this correctly, by all means have a vet do it.  Minis should not be body clipped especially if winter is coming on.  Their long coat protects them from the weather.  During the hot summer, it won’t hurt them, but unless you have a thick winter blanket and warm stall, please do not body clip your horse.  They are known for their long thick coats.

Feeding the Miniature Horse

During the summer months when there is plenty of grass, that should be enough for them. However, too much grass in the early spring can be very harmful to minis. They will overeat and get colic which can cause them to founder. Please limit them to grass at this time to just a few hours a day.   If you stall them or have limited grazing areas, feed them twice a day. You can choose a feed for horses, such as a 9 % protein of sweet feed or just plain oats. About a small coffee can size would be plenty. Hay should be fed after graining. A small flake in the mornings, and in the evenings is enough. Make sure the hay you get is good quality “horse” hay. Hay that can be fed to cows, doesn’t mean it is good for horses. Horses have very sensitive stomachs, and can’t eat moldy, or hay that has been wet. Depending on your location, there are several types of hay, such as orchid grass, alfalfa, or just good grass hay. Fescue hay should not be fed to pregnant mares. (in our area, it can cause a mare to not make milk) Also, keep fresh water available at all times. Rinse out your water bucket daily. If you have a large tub, don’t fill it to the top, so you can change the water in it. A horse needs a lot of water, so not to get constipated and colic.   Always watch your horse when you feed him. Observe how they eat. This will tell you a lot about your horse. If they don’t look like they are eating at the same speed or act funny, then something is wrong with your horse. A horse that does not eat should definitely be looked at for sickness. Even if you turn them out in the pasture everyday, observe them for a while before heading back to the house. If they don’t start off grazing, that could be a sign of something not right. For those of you who have large pastures and can’t keep your mini off the grass for long periods, I suggest using something such as the “Best Friend” grazing muzzle.  This will allow them to graze, but can’t overeat until they colic and could lead to founder.

We have several

minis for sale. 

Lots of color and

 small sizes!